Galion High School

Galion Primary School

The Crestline Municipal Swimming Pool

The Crestline Municipal swimming pool features a shallow end for toddlers, wheelchair access and a large water slide. Advocate photo

Galion Intermediate School

Crestline Exempted Village School District

For the first time we are housed in a beautiful single facility for grades K-12, located next to the location of the previous high school

Galion Middle School

Playground at Hamilton Park

Crestline is known for its parks and recreational areas. This playground is located at Hamilton Park. Advocate photo

Crestline Public Library

The Crestline Public Library on North Thoman Street is an excellent facility offering a large collection of books and multi-media materials, and several meetings rooms available for free rental. Advocate photo

Crestline Village Hall, Fire & Police Dept.

Crestline's Village Hall, Fire Department and Police Department are located at 100 North Seltzer Street. Advocate photo

Brownella Cottage

The home of Episcopal Bishop William Scranton Brown, was built in 1887 at a cost of $6,500. In 1979 it was given to the Galion Historical Society and presently serves as their headquarters/museum.

The Log House

Located at Heise Park in Galion, this structure was built around 1822 as a home, then became the original “GALION PUBLIC LIBRARY & READING ROOM”.

The Big Four Depot

Located in Galion, built in 1900 and purchased by the city of Galion in 2000. In the railroads' hey-day, 32 passenger and mail trains came through Galion on an average day.

The Galion Theatre

Located in Downtown Galion, the former movie theatre known as, “THE GALION” was built in 1949. In 1993 it was sold to “THE GALION COMMUNITY THEATRE GROUP”.

Veteran’s Memorial

Located at Heise Park in Galion and was dedicated on May 18, 2002. The memorial is in honor of men and women from the Galion area who have served in our armed forces.

Galion Community Center-YMCA

Galion Public Library

Located in Galion and built in 1904. The money to build this beautiful Classical Ionic Design building was provided by Andrew Carneige.

Galion-Park Square Gazebo

Shunk Museum

Located on North Thoman Street in Crestline. Home of the Crestline Historical Society.
  • The Crestline Municipal swimming pool features a shallow end for toddlers, wheelchair access and a large water slide.
Advocate photo
  • For the first time we are housed in a beautiful single facility for grades K-12, located next to the location of the previous high school
  • Crestline is known for its parks and recreational areas. This playground is located at Hamilton Park.
Advocate photo
  • The Crestline Public Library on North Thoman Street is an excellent facility offering a large collection of books and multi-media materials, and several meetings rooms available for free rental.
Advocate photo
  • Crestline's Village Hall, Fire Department and Police Department are located at 100 North Seltzer Street. 
Advocate photo
  • The home of Episcopal Bishop William Scranton Brown, was built in 1887 at a cost of $6,500.  In 1979 it was given to the Galion Historical Society and presently serves as their headquarters/museum.
  • Located at Heise Park in Galion, this structure was built around 1822 as a home, then became the original “GALION PUBLIC LIBRARY & READING ROOM”.
  • Located in Galion, built in 1900 and purchased by the city of Galion in 2000. In the railroads' hey-day, 32 passenger and mail trains came through Galion on an average day.
  • Located in Downtown Galion, the former movie theatre known as, “THE GALION” was built in 1949. In 1993 it was sold to “THE GALION COMMUNITY THEATRE GROUP”.
  • Located at Heise Park in Galion and was dedicated on May 18, 2002. The memorial is in honor of men and women from the Galion area who have served in our armed forces.
  • Located in Galion and built in 1904. The money to build this beautiful Classical Ionic Design building was provided by Andrew Carneige.
  • Located on North Thoman Street in Crestline.  Home of the Crestline Historical Society.

Upcoming Events

Oct
26

Join us for the 2017 Regional Business EXPO held on Thursday, Ocotber 26 from 4 to 7pm at All Occasions Catering and Banquet Facility in Waldo. We invite you to come out and enjoy everything this event has to offer... and it's FREE!

Nov
2
Citizens of Galion are invited to the Galion Community Theatre on Thursday, November 2, at 7pm for a Candidate Forum. This forum will give Galion residents the opportunity to hear from those running in the November 7th election. Click HERE for full press release. Click HERE for list of Galion Candidates.
Print this page

Crestline History

First came the railroad, and then came the town. It all started in 1850 when a route was needed between Shelby and Galion, a distance of 13 miles, by the Cleveland, Columbus and Cincinnati railroad, or the "Bee Line" as it was known then. The Crestline area, however, wasn't the first choice by railroad officials for the line - Bucyrus was. However, the leading officials of Bucyrus were interested in a wagon road from Sandusky to Columbus.

 

The next choice was Mansfield, but the citizens there had recently financed a road to Newark and were not interested in funding a railroad. The next choice was Leesville, but the residents there were afraid the railroad would take business from many of the citizens there who made livings hauling stone for the Leesville Stone Quarry. This left the railroad with no choice but to run the line through open country.

 

Since there was no town between Shelby and Galion, it was decided that a station should be placed halfway for passenger convenience. The station was constructed where the line crossed the Leesville road.

 

This station soon developed into a town, with a general store, post office, and a few homes. Early settlers in the village believed that the town was the watershed of the state, where streams to the north emptied into Lake Erie and those to the south emptied into the Ohio River, thus the name Crest Line. The town was not on the watershed line, but the name stuck and eventually became one word.

 

Crestline was visited by a journalist named J.A. Crever. Crever said that he "found many large and small houses where a few months ago it was all woods and cultivated fields." At the time, Crestline had two stores, five groceries, two steam sawmills, several boot and shoe shops, numerous mechanic shops, and a tavern. Crever reported that building timber was seen strewn on every land.

 

Crestline, originally a railroad community, now thrives from the various businesses and industries located there. Crestline, however, is still considered a railroad community. The two crossing railroads that caused the beginning of the village still remain active there. Crestline really is "the hub of Ohio".